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Review: Grandpa Green (2011)

Grandpa Green by Lane SmithGrandpa Green

In honor of Grandparent’s Day yesterday, I re-read a favorite Lane Smith picture book, Grandpa Green.  Lane Smith is most notable for his illustrations (like the ones in James and the Giant Peach and The True Story of the Three Little Pigs)  but he has also written a lot of great picture books, such as John, Paul, George, and Ben and The Happy Hocky Family.

In this book, a great-grandson recalls the events of his horticulture-loving great-grandfather’s life.  The simple, straightforward sentences delightfully capture a poignant mood as the child fondly tells his great-grandfather’s story and honors his legacy while traipsing through topiary bushes with his wagon.  The beautiful shades of green that pop off every page are pleasing to the eye and make it clear why this book was a Caldecott Honor award winner.  I also appreciate the literary references when Smith writes about how Grandpa Green became ill with chicken pox and how “He had to stay home from school.  So he read stories about secret gardens and wizards and a little engine that could.”  In fact, the more I have read this book over the years, the more I have appreciated it.  It’s the perfect picture book for a little one to cozy up with Grandma or Grandpa and read together!  Someday, I would love to have students (or my own kids) write their own version of Grandpa Green for their own grandparent.  It would be the most meaningful and heartwarming present.      -Marika

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Review: The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore (2011)

Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris LessmoreThe Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore by William Joyce

I feel like I have read a lot of really great books lately, and a lot of those really great books have been picture books for children.  But no book that I’ve read lately (or ever, really) has affected me as emotionally as The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore which I stumbled across for the first time this week.

What an amazing concept for a book!  Morris Lessmore is a man who loves stories, and is even writing his own life in a book, “one orderly page after another”.  His story is overturned and the words of his book scatter everywhere.  Not knowing what to do or where to go, Morris wanders aimlessly until he is rescued from his daze by one amiable book.  He follows that book and is led to more books who begin to give a new purpose and joy to Morris’ life.

There is so much about this book that is simply wonderful.  The symbolism of Morris’ life represented by the book he is writing is powerful.  The profound way the book tells the story of Morris’ entire life is spellbinding.  The word choice is impeccable, and the pictures evoke an odd mix of feelings, both of tenderness and amusement. More than anything, the message of this story is so, so important!  Books can and do have power in our lives.  They inspire us and bring us wonder. They help us connect to other people.  They help us find purpose in our own lives.  They make us happy.

If I could, I would make sure every teacher had a copy of this book in their classroom, every parent read this book to their children, and every librarian displayed this book in their library.

And….. as if the book itself were not enough to make it worth a read, there is also an app (Imag.N.O.Tron) that you can purchase for $.99 that makes reading The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore quite remarkable.  I won’t even try to explain the app, I would just recommend purchasing it.  It’s worth the money!

Finally, The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore was the inspiration for a short film, which is also fabulous.  But, you don’t have to take my word for it, just ask the Academy.  The movie won the Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film in 2011.  You can watch the entire movie here, but (like always) I would recommend reading the book first!   -Marika

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Review: Last Stop on Market Street (2015)

Last Stop on Market StreetLast Stop on Market Street by Matt de la Pena

He wondered how his nana always found beautiful where he never even thought to look.

CJ and his Nana travel by bus to a soup kitchen after church on Sundays.  CJ has lots of questions for his grandmother and her answers are insightful and wise. I like this book more and more each time I read it.  Nana’s optimistic view of life is inspirational, for both me and CJ.  The pictures by Christian Robinson are simple and engaging and I love how De La Pena uses the story line to take the reader’s attention in one direction and then how the picture on the last page of the book can completely change the readers’ perspective.  This is a fabulous book to read out loud to children and I will be seeking out a copy to add to my personal library.   -Marika

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Review: Sisters (2014)

sisters

It is summertime, so I finally had a chance to read this book. Getting my hands on it during the school year was impossible. Our students, both the girls and boys, are loving this graphic novel about a family that takes a road trip from California to Colorado Springs, Colorado.

Sisters is actually book 2 in a series by Raina Telgemeier. I have not read the first book, and felt that this one stands alone just fine. It is a quick, engaging read and has the power to hook a lot of young readers. I enjoyed the story much more than I expected to. Actually, I really loved it. This may be because the author is close to my age and she wrote about her own life as a child, growing up in a way that seemed very familiar to me.

This book has been nominated by kids for the Colorado Children’s Book Award in 2016. Despite the very stiff competition it has, I’m going to go ahead and predict right now that this one will win the kids’ votes. -Erin

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Review: Once Upon a Cloud (2015)

celeste 2On a recent trip to the public library, I picked up this exquisite new picture book debut by a Disney animator, Claire Keane. Oh, the illustrations in this book! Magical, lush, evocative. I could stare at the drawings of Celeste on their own and never tire of their many nuances, but then there is so much more on each page. The story follows Celeste through her dreams as she attempts to find a good gift for her mother. This book is a treasure for all of us who love to dream and believe in the power of our subconscious to lead us to answers for life’s puzzles.  It is a true example of a book where the art and text enhance each other. Highly recommended for fans of Disney animation. -Erinceleste2 2

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Review: Maude: The Not-So-Noticeable Shrimpton (2012)

Maude

Maude: The Not-So-Noticeable Shrimpton by Lauren Child

I stumbled across this darkly humorous book at the library while I was looking for another written by Lauren Child.  I was drawn in by the pictures (the book is illustrated by Trisha Krauss) which are stylish and unique, filled with bold texture and color, and unlike any I have seen in a children’s picture book before.

I love stories that can appeal to both children and tothe adults who read to them, and Child has written this one to do just that.  Maude, the main character, comes from a family of attention-seekers. They all have a special talent that makes them stand out in a crowd, but Maude is different. She prefers to go unnoticed. Maude is pitied for her blandness but, when she receives an unusual gift (one she didn’t ask for), it turns out she is quite lucky to be inconspicuous. I appreciated the audacious irony Child uses as a curtain for unveiling the lesson that sometimes “not being noticeable is the very best talent of all.”

My children have been choosing this book as a bedtime read-aloud each night since we brought it home from the library.  They love looking for Maude in each of the pictures (as Krauss has cleverly drawn her to blend into the background of the pictures).  As a parent and teacher, I appreciate the wonderfully descriptive vocabulary used by Child to describe each of the characters.

This book is clever and entertaining, and just a little bit dark.  A perfect pick for your next library visit!  -Marika

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Review: Mr. Tiger Goes Wild (2013)

tiger

Mr. Tiger Goes Wild by Peter Brown has been on my mind today. I recently came across a fantastic video of author and illustrator Peter Brown discussing his inspiration for this work. Watching the video reminded me of how much I love, love, love these illustrations. The story tells about Mr. Tiger’s transformation from a proper tiger to one who embraces his wild side. The classes that I shared this book with enjoyed the pictures every bit as much as I did, especially the page where he sheds his clothes. (This illustration is just perfection – the look on his face, the way he is standing. It makes me smile every time I see it.) Truly, every page in this book is a delight.

tiger

Now, will someone please buy me these pajamas?

tiger

-Erin